Everything

“What can I offer the Lord for all He has done for me?  Psalm 116:12 (NLT)

Some people are really good at giving gifts.  Some people know just how to pick out something that uniquely and perfectly suits the recipient — in a way that reveals just how well they know them and what they appreciate.  I always admire people who give good gifts.

Then comes the question: What can I offer the Lord for all He has done for me?

How do I say ‘thank you’ to the One who has given me life and breath … who sustains me daily … who has given all to save me from my own undoing … and who is preparing a future for me that I cannot imagine?  What can I offer the Lord for all He has done for me?

In a word: everything.

I can offer the Lord everything that I am.

I can offer God my heart and my affection.  I can offer God my aspirations and hopes.  I can offer God the work of my hands, the sweat of my brow, the purpose of my lifesong.  I can offer God all of me — body, mind and spirit — the totality of who He made me to be.  (See blogpost entitled All of Me dated June 3, 2014.)

So I do.  I offer God everything that I am.  I offer God my mind/heart … my soul/spirit … and my body/temple.

And even on the days that I mess up and momentarily reclaim a part of me for myself, I resurrender and start over … remembering that all that He has done for me includes the truth that even when I lose a battle, I cannot lose the war.  Jesus has already won the war, and I cannot mess up what He has already done.

4:13 Fitness Club is an expression of offering everything to God.  It is a place where I can bring all of me to the Lord.  It is a place to bring all of who you are alongside others who are bringing all of who they are … and offering it to God.  It is an oasis.  It is a sweet aroma.  It is a sacrifice of praise.

4:13 Fitness Club is where we offer of our lifesong to the Lord.  Won’t you join us?

What can you offer the Lord for all He has done for you?

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Body Too

“Do not let any part of your body become an instrument of evil to serve sin.  Instead, give yourselves completely to God ….”  Romans 6:13a

Owning and operating a fitness ministry can be a conundrum.  Why?  Because for many people, “fitness ministry” is a non sequitur.  It doesn’t quite make sense.  It doesn’t quite accord with their world view.  Or it sounds fluffy, superficial or extraneous.

But the truth is that it is guttural and gritty … and it is foundational to our faith.

To walk with Jesus means to eventually give every part of your life to Him.  To walk with Jesus means to live in a constant relationship with God that is vibrant and changing, as He invades more and more areas of your life.  To walk with Jesus means, as some like to say, whole-life devotion.

And “whole-life devotion” means all of you, doesn’t it?

I find it interesting that there are so many debates in the Christian world about how God made us:  “Are we soul AND spirit?”  “Is the will different from the mind or the heart?”  “Is my soul separate from my heart and mind or are they connected … or the same?”

So many discussions about the intangible aspects of self.

So many discussions about the intangible aspects of self when, unquestionable, we have a tangible aspect of self.  A tangible aspect that gets little discussion.

God made us multi-faceted.  He made us, like Him, with several differing aspects that are united within a single whole.  And one of the facets He gave us, unquestionable, is a body.

To walk with Jesus means to give every part of your life to Him.  To walk with Jesus means to allow Him to invade more and more areas of your life.  To walk with Jesus means whole-life devotion.

Whole-life:  Body, Mind & Spirit (or however you wish to divide your intangibles).

Body too.

Will you allow Jesus to invade this part of you too?

 

Deepening Dependence

“But as for me, I watch in hope for the Lord, I wait for God my Savior; my God will hear me.”  Micah 7:7 (NASB)

This age is one filled with busyness — seeking, striving, working, overworking, constant, non-stop pursuit.  And with it comes so much stress and pressure that never let up.

Because if we do, then everything will fall apart.  Right?

At least that’s what we tell ourselves.  At least that is what the evil one wants us to believe.

But the truth is that we need to stop.  The truth is that we need to rest.

The truth is that our bodies need rest — that our bodies crave rest — in order to be at their best.   And our souls need to rest in order thrive … perhaps in order to survive.

Why?

I cannot say for sure.  But it is incontrovertible that God built into our very being a need for rest — on all levels.  When we are awake for extended periods of time, our body begins to shut down for sleep.  When we exercise a particular muscle group, we then need to rest it in order for it to heal, grow and strengthen.  When we study intensely for a period of time, our minds then need a break in order to assimilate the information absorbed.

And our souls need rest from the constant striving in order to deepen our dependence on God.

When we rest in the Lord, we acknowledge that we are not in control … that the outcome (of whatever it is we are striving to accomplish) is not dependent on us alone.  We acknowledge that all things are actually in the hands of the Lord.  We admit to our frailty and limitations and surrender to His strength and all-sufficiency.

God says: “wait on Me.  Depend on Me.  Trust in Me alone.”

When we rest, not only are we taking care of the bodies and souls that God gave us, but more importantly, we are depending on God and honoring Him in the process.

For me, I learning this to be true:  deepening my dependence on myself isn’t get me very far … but deepening my dependence on God will take me everywhere I truly want to be.

Integrated

His disciples asked Him, ‘Rabbi, who committed the sin that caused him to be born blind, this man or his parents?'”  John 9:2 (NET)

I was talking today with a church leader about the implications of a person with a Western worldview reading a text written by ancient Middle Easterners.  The Bible, of course, was written by ancient Middle Easterner’s who write from an ancient Middle Eastern worldview.  Most of the people I interact with on a daily basis read the Bible from a modern Western worldview.  And as I’m sure you know, one’s worldview is not an overt aspect of how we perceive and interpret things. Instead, a worldview is very subtle and covert, but it colors everything we see and interact with.

The distinctions are many, I am sure. But in my studies thus far, I’ve become acutely aware of this:

  • A Western worldview is a very dualistic lens. It sees the inner and the outer/external journey as separate and distinct, almost antagonistic against each other.
  • An Eastern worldview, especially and including an ancient Middle Eastern worldview, understands a person to be very integrated, body mind and spirit as one.

As such, many Westerners are perplexed by passages such as the one in John 9.  What a silly question to one with a Western worldview.  But for one with an Eastern worldview, the question is obvious. Physical sickness can and often does begin with the mind and soul.  Even Western medicine is beginning to admit the inherent connection between inner and outer aspects of self.

Try reading the Gospels with an Eastern worldview in mind. Try looking at church history with the overtones of an Eastern worldview. You will see things differently.

  • Like the laws of the Torah that make a person clean or unclean by what they eat and what they touch.
  • Like the woman who only needed to touch the hem of Jesus’ robe to stop a perpetual bleeding.
  • Like how lepers were cast out of cities to survive on their own, not only because of the physical contagion, but also because if their perceived spiritual depravity.
  • Like how the early church was the one to start the concept of hospitals … because they knew that caring for the body was also caring for the soul in some deeply mysterious, God-breathed way.

May we all learn to embrace our God-breathed integratedness and, in the process, come to know and reflect our Creator more clearly.

Flesh

“And the Word was made flesh and dwelt among us ….”  John 1:14a (KJV)

In Christian parlance, the word “flesh” has gotten a bad rap.  Most Christians associate “the flesh” with things sinful or evil or tempting.  But the word used for “flesh” in the Bible actually carries no such connotation.

The Greek word “sarx” simply means “flesh” — skin, meat, bones — whether of men, beasts, fish or birds.  It has neither a good or a bad association with it.  The New Living Translation of the Bible does a better job of keeping the word neutral, in its original sense.

So why & how did “flesh” get such a bad rap?  That’s a long and complicated story, but for now, may God encourage you & renew your mind about how you think about your flesh.

Your flesh was created by God and given to you.  It is a gift.  It has amazing potential for good and for beauty and for reflecting God’s glory.  Your flesh is an integral  part of how God made you.  And He does not ask you to divide yourself against yourself.  In God’s kingdom, there is no separation between the sacred and the secular.  God wants all of you.

Can the flesh do bad things?  Yes.  And so can the mind.  And so can the spirit.  It’s what we do or don’t do with our flesh that constitutes something good or something evil.  The flesh itself is not evil.

After all, the Word became flesh.  God Himself incarnate in the flesh …

… and He did something wonderful with His.  Will you?

The Body is More

For life is more than food, and the body more than clothing.”  Luke 12:23 (NLT)

Our memories are not just stored in our minds. I know it sounds hard to believe, and sometimes we wish it was that simple. If it were, we could simple blocks things out of our minds, or we could ask God to wash our minds clean and memories would be gone. But it isn’t that simple. God made us as integrated beings, and as such, our memories are not just stored in our minds. Our memories are also stored in our bodies.

That’s why, for one thing, a certain touch or movement can bring back a wave of emotion or thought. It happened to me in yoga today; the movement of my body released a memory and the feelings attached. And this is just one example of how memories are stored.

Scripture has told us all along that our bodies are more than food and clothing. Our bodies carry the very essence of who we are, of who we have been, and of who we will and can be. Our bodies are vessels of more than just the ornamentation we put on the outside. Our bodies carry not only our stature and our presence, but also our memories and dreams and fears.

And God — the One who holds us — does too. In the 56th Psalm, it says that God keeps track of all my sorrows. “You have collected all my tears in your bottle. You have recorded each one in your book.” Psalm 56:8 (NLT)

Isn’t that beautiful!?  God, who carries me and my body and life, also carries my memories, sorrows and tears. And He treats them with tender, loving care.

Shouldn’t we?

Your body is more than clothing. It carries much, much more. And it is worthy of the very same tender, loving care that the Father gives.

Abundance

I have come so that they may have life, and have it abundantly.” John 10:10b (NET)

(Dedicated to Kim)

I spent the first part of the Christmas holiday sick. Just a winter cold, but still sick. And I struggled to get past the sickness of my body to let my mind and spirit relish in the joy of Christmas, As I struggled, I was reminded of what another Christian theologian once wrote: “Sickness makes it impossible to avoid the reality of our bodies. When I am sick, I am not a mind (or soul) with a suffering body; I am the suffering body.”

And then I learned that my dear friend Kim is battling breast cancer. As I listened to Kim and her process, I was again clearly reminded that God made us as integrated wholes. Kim’s battle is much more than a physical battle in her body; it is a battle in her body, mind and spirit. It is a battle that involves all of her.

God Himself is triune — three parts in one indivisible whole. And He made us in His image. Yet many Christians have come to believe that we have bodies … not that we are, at least in part, bodies. But there are times, like when we are sick, when we are reminded that we are integrated bodies. God made us that way. The health of one aspect of myself affects the other aspects of myself. The health of my body affects my mind and spirit. The health of my mind affects my body and spirit (as seen, for example, in people with brain damage.). And the health of my spirit affects my mind and body. An integrated whole.

In the miracle of Christmas, Jesus came to give us life in all of its abundance. And, given the way God made us, I firmly believe that abundant life has to include all aspects of how God made us. Abundant mind, body and spirit.

So as I prepare to have my friend Kim over for dinner tonight, I am hoping to encourage and lift her up in mind and spirit … knowing and trusting that the health of her mind and spirit will help to foster abundance in her body.

And as I prepare for a new year, I ponder anew where God wants to see greater abundance in me.